Mortons Neuroma Diagnosis

Overview

Neuromas are generally benign or non-cancerous growths of nerve tissue, developing in various parts of the body. Morton?s Neuromas are confined to the nerves of the foot, most commonly, between the third and fourth toes. The condition involves a thickening of the tissue around one of the digital nerves leading to the toes and does not qualify as an actual tumor. The affliction causes a sharp, burning pain, usually in the region of the ball of the foot. A patient?s toes may also sting, burn or exhibit numbness. Often, the symptoms have been likened to ?walking on a marble.?

Causes

Inappropriate footwear is one of the principle causes of Morton?s neuroma. Toe spring and tapering toe boxes are the most problematic shoe design features that contribute to this health problem. Morton?s neuroma occurs when one of your nerves is stretched and pinched, which happens with great frequency in people who wear shoes incorporating these design features. A professional shoe fitting should always be sought if you are struggling with neuroma-related symptoms.

Symptoms

A Morton’s neuroma causes a “burning” sharp pain and numbness on the bottom of the foot in the involved area, and this pain and numbness can radiate to the nearby toes. The pain is usually increased by walking or when the ball of the foot is squeezed together and decreased with massaging. It may force a person to stop walking or to limp from the pain.

Diagnosis

Negative signs include no obvious deformities, erythema, signs of inflammation, or limitation of movement. Direct pressure between the metatarsal heads will replicate the symptoms, as will compression of the forefoot between the finger and thumb so as to compress the transverse arch of the foot. This is referred to as Mulder?s Sign. There are other causes of pain in the forefoot. Too often all forefoot pain is categorized as neuroma. Other conditions to consider are capsulitis, which is an inflammation of ligaments that surrounds two bones, at the level of the joint. In this case, it would be the ligaments that attach the phalanx (bone of the toe) to the metatarsal bone. Inflammation from this condition will put pressure on an otherwise healthy nerve and give neuroma-type symptoms. Additionally, an intermetatarsal bursitis between the third and fourth metatarsal bones will also give neuroma-type symptoms because it too puts pressure on the nerve. Freiberg’s disease, which is an osteochondritis of the metatarsal head, causes pain on weight bearing or compression.

Non Surgical Treatment

The good news is that the pain can often be relieved fairly easily with the right softer styled orthotic (even in those cases where there is concurrent plantar plate tears and capsulitis!), but its important to remeber that even if your no longer in pain, there is no magic cure to speeding up the healing process so one must take care of their feet for 6-12 weeks. As a rule of thumb a neuroma should always be treated conservatively where possible. This means icing and resting the area, trying to remove the causative factors, and providing postural control and support via metatarsal domes or, if needed, specialised pre-made or custom made orthotics.interdigital neuroma

Surgical Treatment

When conservative measures are unsuccessful, surgery can be a good choice in the treatment of Morton’s neuroma. The operation for Morton’s neuroma does not require an overnight hospital stay. The anesthetic used is an ankle block, which completely numbs the foot during the surgery. The physician removes the neuroma from an incision made on the top of the foot between the involved metatarsal heads. The nerve to the interspace is exposed and cut next to the metatarsal heads.

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